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🌨️☂️ This moody snow scene created by artist Martin Lewis, depicts wary pedestrians braving the frosty elements. Their trench coats and umbrellas are all that shield them from the blizzard. Snow quickly accumulates on the city stoops and sidewalks as they make their way home. Born in Castlemaine, Australia, Martin Lewis became an important printmaker in the United States during the 1920s and 1930s. He lived in New York City most of his life where he was excited to chronicle the rhythms of city life. A trip to Japan in 1920-22, deeply influenced his printmaking. Lewis and lithographer George C. Miller organized a printmaking school in New York, in 1934. Later Lewis taught at the Art Students League from 1944 to 1951.

Martin Lewis, American (1881-1962), "Stoops in the Snow," 1930, drypoint with sandpaper ground

#MartinLewis #AmericanPrints #AmericanArt #SnowDay #StormyWeather #StoopsInSnow #CitySnow #NYC #LetItSnow #SnowyCommute #NewYorkStreets #NewYorkInTheSnow #Early20thCentury #AmericanPrintmaking
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🌨️☂️ This moody snow scene created by artist Martin Lewis, depicts wary pedestrians braving the frosty elements. Their trench coats and umbrellas are all that shield them from the blizzard. Snow quickly accumulates on the city stoops and sidewalks as they make their way home. Born in Castlemaine, Australia, Martin Lewis became an important printmaker in the United States during the 1920s and 1930s. He lived in New York City most of his life where he was excited to chronicle the rhythms of city life. A trip to Japan in 1920-22, deeply influenced his printmaking. Lewis and lithographer George C. Miller organized a printmaking school in New York, in 1934. Later Lewis taught at the Art Students League from 1944 to 1951.
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Martin Lewis, American (1881-1962), Stoops in the Snow, 1930, drypoint with sandpaper ground 

#MartinLewis #AmericanPrints #AmericanArt #SnowDay #StormyWeather #StoopsInSnow #CitySnow #NYC #LetItSnow #SnowyCommute #NewYorkStreets #NewYorkInTheSnow  #Early20thCentury #AmericanPrintmaking

🌲 Artist Clare Leighton created this wood engraving, "Loading" (1931), that depicts timber workers stacking snowy logs onto a carrier in the woods. The English/American illustrator wrote and illustrated numerous books promoting the countryside and the people who worked the land. During the 1920s and 1930s, as the world around her became increasingly industrial and urban, Leighton focused on bucolic, rural scenes that featured working men and women. In the 1950s she created designs for Steuben Glass and Wedgwood. She designed several stained glass windows for churches in New England including the Worcester Cathedral, in Worcester, Massachusetts.

Clare Leighton, American (1898-1989), "Loading," 1931, wood engraving

#ClareLeighton #AmericanArt #AmericanPrints #InTheWoods #Timberwood #Countryside #WinterWoods #WoodlandScene #WoodEngraving
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🌲 Artist Clare Leighton created this wood engraving, Loading (1931), that depicts timber workers stacking snowy logs onto a carrier in the woods. The English/American illustrator wrote and illustrated numerous books promoting the countryside and the people who worked the land. During the 1920s and 1930s, as the world around her became increasingly industrial and urban, Leighton focused on bucolic, rural scenes that featured working men and women. In the 1950s she created designs for Steuben Glass and Wedgwood. She designed several stained glass windows for churches in New England including the Worcester Cathedral, in Worcester, Massachusetts.
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Clare Leighton, American (1898-1989), Loading, 1931, wood engraving

#ClareLeighton #AmericanArt #AmericanPrints #InTheWoods #Timberwood #Countryside #WinterWoods #WoodlandScene #WoodEngraving

This gentleman in a fur hat with commanding presence is no one in particular, but the image bears similarity to a red chalk drawing from a series of grand old men created by Rembrandt. "Tronies," a Dutch word for "face," refers to a genre common in the Dutch Golden age and Flemish Baroque period that consisted of figures with exaggerated facial expressions, as seen in Rembrandt’s fantasy portraits.

The man in the divided fur cap is likely a lowly fellow of little affluence. To Rembrandt, the sitter’s status was infinitely less important than his visage. Rembrandt enjoyed the company of such commoners and would illustrate their gestures of sorrow and disquiet. In an effort to reveal human truths, the artist embraced these unsavory characters as his subjects.

Rembrandt van Rijn, Netherlands, 1606-1669, "Old Man with Divided Fur Cap," 1640, etching and drypoint

#furcap #winterhat #rembrandt #rembrandtvanrijn #dutch #oldmaster #tronies #portrait #17thcentury #dutchgoldenage #17thcenturyprintmaking #print #printmaking #etching #drypoint #intaglio #coolhat #artcomplexmuseum #musuemfromhome
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This gentleman in a fur hat with commanding presence is no one in particular, but the image bears similarity to a red chalk drawing  from a series of grand old men created by Rembrandt. Tronies, a Dutch word for face, refers to a genre common in the Dutch Golden age and Flemish Baroque period that consisted of figures with exaggerated facial expressions, as seen in Rembrandt’s fantasy portraits.

The man in the divided fur cap is likely a lowly fellow of little affluence. To Rembrandt, the sitter’s status was infinitely less important than his visage. Rembrandt enjoyed the company of such commoners and would illustrate their gestures of sorrow and disquiet. In an effort to reveal human truths, the artist embraced these unsavory characters as his subjects.
—
Rembrandt van Rijn, Netherlands, 1606-1669, Old Man with Divided Fur Cap, 1640, etching and drypoint

#furcap #winterhat #rembrandt #rembrandtvanrijn #dutch #oldmaster #tronies #portrait #17thcentury #dutchgoldenage #17thcenturyprintmaking #print #printmaking #etching #drypoint #intaglio #coolhat #artcomplexmuseum #musuemfromhome

Curled up with a good book today? You are not alone! During the 1930s the winters were particularly harsh. American artist Wanda Gág spent time curled up in bed writing instead of working in her primary art form, lithography. Snow Drifts was one of the few original prints she created during the winter of 1934, with the assistance of lithographer George C. Miller (1894-1965). A pioneering printmaker and illustrator, Gág is best known for her award-winning children's book Millions of Cats (1928), the oldest American storybook still in print. She devoted much time to drawing and her motto recorded in her diary read, “draw to live, live to draw.”

Wanda Gág, American (1893-1946), Snow Drifts (Bridge in Winter), 1934, lithograph

#WandaGág #SnowDrifts #Winter #LetItSnow #Lithography #CurledUp #AmericanArt #AmericanPrintmaker #MillionsOfCats #NewburyAward #Draw2LiveLive2Draw #GreatWomenArtists #AmericanIllustrator #20thCenturyAmericanArt #ArtComplexMuseum #MuseumFromHome
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Curled up with a good book today? You are not alone! During the 1930s the winters were particularly harsh. American artist Wanda Gág  spent time curled up in bed writing instead of working in her primary art form, lithography. Snow Drifts was one of the few original prints she created during the winter of 1934, with the assistance of lithographer George C. Miller (1894-1965). A pioneering printmaker and illustrator, Gág is best known for her award-winning childrens book Millions of Cats (1928), the oldest American storybook still in print. She devoted much time to drawing and her motto recorded in her diary read, “draw to live, live to draw.” 

Wanda Gág, American (1893-1946), Snow Drifts (Bridge in Winter), 1934, lithograph

#WandaGág #SnowDrifts #Winter #LetItSnow #Lithography #CurledUp #AmericanArt #AmericanPrintmaker #MillionsOfCats #NewburyAward #Draw2LiveLive2Draw #GreatWomenArtists #AmericanIllustrator #20thCenturyAmericanArt #ArtComplexMuseum #MuseumFromHome

Born on January 4, 1877 to English immigrant parents Thomas and Liza Hartley, American artist Edmund "Marsden" Hartley was one of nine children. His mom died when he was eight years old. In at attempt to reinvent himself the artist adopted his stepmother's maiden name, "Marsden" as his own. His love for the outdoors inspired his art. He created Waxenstien #9 (a mountain in the Bavarian Alps) while living near Munich, Germany. The jagged peaks of Waxenstein echo the zig-zagged pattern of evergreen timbers at the foot of the mountain range. Hartley printed more than 36 versions of this image.

"Being made new again and the gift of rebirth is all that lets anyone really live..The great secret is to never get stuck, imprisoned in common social patterns.." -Marsden Hartley

Marsden Hartley, American (1877-1943), Waxenstein #9, 1933, Lithograph

#MarsdenHartley #Waxenstein #BavarianAlps #AmericanArt #AmericanPrints #MunichGermany #Munich #Mountains #MountainRange #HappyBirthdayMarsden #January4
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Born on January 4, 1877 to English immigrant parents Thomas and Liza Hartley, American artist Edmund Marsden Hartley was one of nine children. His mom died when he was eight years old. In at attempt to reinvent himself the artist adopted his stepmothers maiden name, Marsden as his own. His love for the outdoors inspired his art. He created  Waxenstien #9 (a mountain in the Bavarian Alps) while living near Munich, Germany. The jagged peaks of Waxenstein echo the zig-zagged pattern of evergreen timbers at the foot of the mountain range. Hartley printed more than 36 versions of this image. 

Being made new again and the gift of rebirth is all that lets anyone really live..The great secret is to never get stuck, imprisoned in common social patterns..       -Marsden Hartley 

Marsden Hartley, American (1877-1943), Waxenstein #9, 1933, Lithograph 

#MarsdenHartley #Waxenstein #BavarianAlps #AmericanArt #AmericanPrints #MunichGermany #Munich #Mountains #MountainRange #HappyBirthdayMarsden #January4
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